once a volcano

Mt Shank, the small green no-trees volcano that made child-me feel sad, is now covered in soft mounded sheok casuarinas and other local plants i don't know the names for ('we planted them in the 80's').

Here's Ken Burns, Bunganditj/Boandik man, telling us some of their dreaming stories — FdR is taking notes.

Mt Shank is off the road to Port Macdonell, west of its more famous sister the better known Blue Lake — somewhere on the sound file Ken tells us how old these long dormant inactive volcanoes are. Edge-faded memories associate Carpenter Rocks, inside a car, Aunty Mick, Mt Shank.

IMG_0452.JPG

looking into the caldera

fracture affect  -— all in details

fracture affect  -— all in details

tick-tick Work

What it is that makes people ‘tick’, what makes people work, as in function, what drives a person to do what a person does? A rhetorical question with a cog and gear time metaphor. I follow lots of others who are drawn to wondering about the ‘tick’ that produces, invents or creates. Freud and his drives. Norbert Wiener for his invention of cybernetics as a functioning system, and too also for his [tick]  anxiety toward its affects. What is the ‘tick’, the jump, the leap or the force that drives creativity? How to harness that force? Towards these questions I have explored the forces and affects of disquiet, in the individual(s) toward the collective(s), toward the making of the world, and worlds, and in turn I have exposed (made exterior) a personal sense of anxiety and disquiet toward that making, a making that is eternally strange and (es)stranging even whilst it is familiar. (One of the offshoots of this approach is the beginning of a discussion (ongoing, without conclusion) about the civic role of courtesy, manners, and face in the electronic polis, world(s) of technicity.) 

 

tick tick tick

tock 

 

tick \ approval

tick \ pest

tick \ work

tock \ rythym

Shomei Tomatsu,  11:02 Nagasaki  (detail), 1961.    The photograph from which the series takes its name is a watch that was dug up 0.7km from the epicenter of the explosion and which stopped at 11:02 a.m on the 9th of August 1945. Tokyo Metropolitain Museum of Photography.

Shomei Tomatsu, 11:02 Nagasaki (detail), 1961.

The photograph from which the series takes its name is a watch that was dug up 0.7km from the epicenter of the explosion and which stopped at 11:02 a.m on the 9th of August 1945. Tokyo Metropolitain Museum of Photography.